Ripple Tote Bag – Free Crochet Pattern

Ripple Tote Bag - Free Pattern by EyeLoveKnots, Contributor Post for The Stitchin' Mommy | www.thestitchinmommy.com

This pattern was designed by Alexandra of EyeLoveKnots, exclusively for The Stitchin’ Mommy.

I am planning on going back to school in the fall, and so I thought I’d get a jump start on my school bag. This tote bag is nice and sturdy being that it’s made of t-shirt yarn, but still has some stretch to it and isn’t too bulky or heavy. I carried it around with my binder and planner inside and it wears well. Alternatively, it would make a nice beach bag or to carry yarn and WIPS around too!

Ripple Tote Bag

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Materials:
  • 150 yards of Super Bulky T-Shirt Yarn – I used Premier Yarn’s Craft-Tee Yarn in Yellow and Dark Gray
  • N15/10mm Crochet Hook
  • Tapestry Needle for Weaving in Ends – I used a #18 for the Yellow Yarn
  • Opt Small Crochet Hook for Weaving in Ends – I used a C2.5mm for the Gray
  • 1 ⅞” of 2” White Belting
  • Small Amount of Thread for Sewing Belt – I used Hobby Lobby’s #10 Crochet Thread artiste 100% Mercerized Egyptian Cotton in White

Abbreviations:

SC – Single Crochet
HDC – Half Double Crochet
DC – Double Crochet
TC – Triple Crochet
sc3tog – Single Crochet Three Stitches Together (also called a decrease)

To work a sc3tog: Insert hook into first stitch, yarn over, pull through (2 loops on hook), insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, pull through (3 loops on hook), insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, pull through (4 loops on hook), yarn over, pull through all 4 loops on the hook.

dc3tog – Double Crochet Three Stitches Together (also called a decrease)

To work a dc3tog: Yarn over, insert hook into the first stitch, yarn over, pull through (3 loops on hook), yarn over, pull through two loops on hook, yarn over, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, pull through (4 loops on hook), yarn over, pull through two loops on hook, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, pull through (5 loops on hook), yarn over, pull through two loops on hook, yarn over, pull through all 4 loops on the hook.

Gauge:

20 HDC by 4 Rows = 12″ by 3.5″

Finished Size:

12″ Wide by 15″ Tall, excluding strap. 38.5″ Tall with straps. Tote will fall at hip level.

Notes:

  • I worked up this tote in two different seatings. It took me just over 3 hours to finish it.
  • The numbers below the photos coordinate with the photo number.
  • The beginning chain 2 counts as a stitch in the ripple pattern.
  • Join to the top of the beginning chain, unless otherwise stated.
  • To change colors, I worked in a non-traditional way. I completed the round by joining with the same color, and then pulled in the new color, chained two and pulled the old color tight so the first loop wasn’t noticeable. I carried my unused yarn up so I would have less ends to weave in later. You can fasten off at the end of each round, and weave in if you choose but the t-shirt yarn is difficult to weave in and out.
  • This was my first time using the Craft Tee yarn. The Gray was very soft and stretchy, while the yellow was tough with hardly any stretch. I also found the Gray thickness to be very inconsistent, while the yellow was the same throughout. Keep this in mind if purchasing t-shirt yarn as you may need to adjust the number of stitches to get the size you want.

Instructions:

With Gray, Chain 21. HDC into the 3rd chain, and each chain across. (20 HDC)
R2 – 4: Chain 1, turn. HDC into the first HDC, and each HDC across. (20 HDC)
R5: Chain 1, turn. SC into the 1st HDC, and each of the next 19 HDCs, work 4 SCs down the side of the piece, work 20 SCs along the opposite side of the beginning foundation chain, work 4 SCs up the side of the piece and join to the first SC.
R6: Chain 3 (doesn’t count as a stitch). TC into the 1st SC, DC into the next 2 SCs, HDC into the next SC, SC into the next 3 SCs, HDC into the next SC, DC into the next 2 SCs, (TC into the next SC, DC into the next 2 SCs, HDC into the next SC, SC into the next 3 SCs, HDC into the next SC, DC into the next 2 SCs) 4x. Join. (50 stitches)
R7: Chain 2. DC into the 1st 4 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches, (3 DC into the next stitch, DC into the next 3 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, DC into the 1st stitch. Join. (50 DCs)
R8 – 9: In Yellow, Chain 2. DC into the 1st 4 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches, (3 DC into the next stitch, DC into the next 3 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, DC into the 1st stitch. Join. (50 DCs)
R10 – 11: In Gray, Chain 2. DC into the 1st 4 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches, (3 DC into the next stitch, DC into the next 3 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, DC into the 1st stitch. Join. (50 DCs)
R12 – 13: In Yellow, Chain 2. DC into the 1st 4 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches, (3 DC into the next stitch, DC into the next 3 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, DC into the 1st stitch. Join. (50 DCs)
R14 – 15: In Gray, Chain 2. DC into the 1st 4 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches, (3 DC into the next stitch, DC into the next 3 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, DC into the 1st stitch. Join. (50 DCs)
R16 – 17: In Yellow, Chain 2. DC into the 1st 4 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches, (3 DC into the next stitch, DC into the next 3 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, DC into the 1st stitch. Join. (50 DCs)
R18: In Gray, Chain 2. DC into the 1st 4 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches, (3 DC into the next stitch, DC into the next 3 stitches, dc3tog, DC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, DC into the 1st stitch. Join. (50 DCs)
R19: Chain 1. Work 2 SCs into the 1st stitch, SC into the next 2 stitches, sc3tog, SC into the next 3 stitches, (3 SCs into the next stitch, SC into the next 3 stitches, sc3tog, SC into the next 3 stitches) 4x, SC into the 1st stitch. Join to the 1st SC. (50 SCs)

Fasten Off, and Weave in Ends.

Strap:

If you choose to crochet the strap, you can lay the bag flat, mark the center of the sides, and work five HDCs with the third being the marked stitch for 75 rows and then sew to the opposite side. If you choose to go this route, I suggest lining the strap to avoid the inevitable stretch.

Because I did not want to line mine, I went a different route – I used Belting.

SM1First thing I did was lay my bag flat and found the center points at the sides. I did not mark mine, but you may want to put some stitch markers at these points so you don’t lose your spot.

1 – 2. Then, I fold my belting in so I could squeeze it through the [marked] stitch on Round 17 – I did so on this round to give the strap more support and the bag less stretch.
3. I overlapped both pieces by 7″

SM2

I then threaded my needle, doubling the strands and tying a knot at the end.

1. I first inserted my needle from inside the layer closest to me so I could hide the knot inside the two pieces. I then reinforced this stitch through both layers, and continued working upward through both layers using a whipstitch. I used the holes on the belting as a reference point stitching through the second hole from each end and skipping one row. You can better see the whipstitch on the 3rd and 4th photos.
2 – 3. When I got closer to the frayed end, I folded it over about ¼” and worked a running stitch through the layers all the way across.

(This belting is made similarly to grosgrain ribbon and could also be burned to seal ends.)

4. Once I made my way back to the start, I pulled the piece to the side and weaved my ends into the actual tote bag.

Repeat for other end, and enjoy your new Ripple Tote Bag!

Please feel free to make and sell your own Ripple Tote Bag, but please DO NOT claim this pattern as your own nor should you sell my pattern, and DO NOT re-publish my photos as your own. DO NOT copy and paste my pattern anywhere, link to it instead. DO NOT publish photos of my process, please.

 

Alexandra started her crafting adventure with needlepoint on plastic canvas nine years ago, making anything she could think of from masks for school plays to pictures frames and small trinkets. Two years ago she jumped head first into crocheting and jewelry making, and her blogging journey as EyeLoveKnots, named in honor of family members affected by Retinoblastoma, a cancer of the eye. You can find more information about Retinoblastoma at Eye Cancer MD. See more from Alexandra on her Facebook page, Ravelry, and Etsy shop.

 

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